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The Benefits Of Adding A Deadlift To Your Leg Workout Routine

Last updated: May 23, 2022

Everyone who lifts weights should know the importance of leg day. Strong legs are aesthetically pleasing, but they’re also necessary for daily functional activities and overall health. If you want to stay injury-free and improve your lower body strength, you should make sure that you’re incorporating several different exercises into your leg workout routine.

There are a variety of exercises that can be done to work the legs, and one of the best is the deadlift. The deadlift is an incredibly effective exercise for building strength and size in the legs, and it should be a staple in any leg workout routine.

In this article, we'll talk about:

Keep reading to learn more about the benefits of adding a deadlift to your leg workout routine!deadlifts exercises

What is a Deadlift?

The deadlift is a compound exercise, meaning it uses multiple joints and muscles to perform the lift. The movement works the entire posterior chain, including the hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. It's considered one of the best exercises for building strength and size in the legs, and it can be performed with a variety of different variations.

Deadlifts are among the three main powerlifting movements, along with the squat and bench press. Powerlifting is a sport that focuses on maximal strength in these three lifts. But you don't have to be a powerlifter to reap the benefits of deadlifts!

The deadlift is a compound exercise, meaning it uses multiple joints and muscles to perform the lift. The movement works the entire posterior chain, including the hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. It's considered one of the best exercises for building strength and size in the legs, and it can be performed with a variety of different variations.

Benefits of Deadlifts

While the squat is often referred to as the "king of exercises," the deadlift is a close second. It's an incredibly effective and simple exercise for building strength and size in the legs, and it has a variety of other benefits as well.

Some of these benefits include:

  • Improved posture: Deadlifts work the entire posterior chain, which includes the muscles in the back. Strengthening these muscles can help to improve your posture and alleviate back pain.
  • Increased grip strength: Deadlifts also work the forearm and grip muscles in your hands. This can help to improve your grip strength, which can be beneficial for other exercises (like pull-ups) and everyday activities (like opening jars).
  • Improved core stability: The deadlift is an excellent exercise for building core stability. This is because the movement requires you to use your core muscles to stabilize your body while lifting the weight.
  • Boosts in testosterone and growth hormone: Heavy resistance exercises like deadlifts have been shown to increase testosterone and growth hormone levels. This can help to improve strength, muscle mass, and fat loss. For men, this also promotes healthy aging and fertility by keeping testosterone levels up as they get older.

Types of Deadlifts

Many different deadlift variations can be performed to target specific muscles. The most common deadlift variations are:

  • Conventional Deadlift: This is the most popular type of deadlift. It's done with a shoulder-width stance and the hands placed outside of the knees. To complete the lift, simply bend down and grip the bar, lift it off the ground, and stand up straight while keeping your core engaged and your back flat.
  • Sumo Deadlift: The sumo deadlift is performed with a wide stance and the hands placed inside the knees. This variation puts more emphasis on the inner thigh and glute muscles.
  • Romanian Deadlift: The Romanian deadlift is performed with a narrow stance and the hands placed outside of the knees. The knees are kept slightly bent when doing the movement, and the hips are pushed back as you lower the bar down the thighs. This variation puts more emphasis on the hamstrings.
  • Stiff-Legged Deadlift: The stiff-legged deadlift is done with a shoulder-width stance and the hands placed outside the knees. The knees are kept straight throughout the movement as you lower the bar down the thighs and return to the starting position. Similar to the Romanian deadlift, this variation puts more emphasis on the hamstrings.
  • Trap Bar Deadlift: The trap bar deadlift is done with a hexagonal barbell. Trap bar deadlift benefits include being easier on the lower back and putting more emphasis on the quads.

How Often To Deadlift

How often you deadlift will depend on your goals and experience level. If you're new to lifting, you may want to start with 1-2 times per week. If you're more experienced, you can increase this to 3-4 times per week.

Make sure you're incorporating a variety of calisthenics back exercises and other strength training exercises into your routine to ensure you're working all of the muscles in your body. A well-rounded routine is the best way to ensure you see results.

FAQs

How often should I deadlift if I'm new to lifting?

If you're new to lifting, you may want to start with 1-2 times per week. As you become more experienced, you can increase this to 3-4 times per week.

How much weight should I be able to deadlift?

How much weight you should be able to deadlift will depend on your experience level. If you're new to lifting, start with a lighter weight and increase the weight gradually as you become more comfortable with the movement.

If you're more experienced, you can start with a heavier weight. Remember that form is more important than the amount of weight you're lifting. Increasing the weight too quickly or before you master the proper form can lead to injury.

Do deadlifts help you lose weight?

Yes. Deadlifts can help you lose weight by boosting your metabolism and growing muscle that burns calories. The exercise itself also burns calories, which can help you to create a calorie deficit and lose weight.


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