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Can Veganism Save the Ocean?

Last updated: June 24, 2022

Veganism has become an extremely popular lifestyle movement throughout the years. It was first introduced as a spin-off of vegetarianism, where some cultures adopted it both for diet and ideals towards religious and health practices. As more foods and products contained animal/animal by-products, veganism became more than just a diet - it cemented itself as an entirely active and conscious choice for the betterment of our communities and our planet, in addition to personal benefits. Veganism is extremely sustainable at its core - and this sustainability can help us to save the planet's most precious resource - our oceans.

In this article, we will define the problems that the oceans are facing through traditional means of exploitation and pollution. We will then define veganism in a way that is conducive to the cleansing and maintenance of the precious materials we can find in the oceans, including water, habitat, and climate change. Ultimately, we want to answer the old question: can veganism contribute to saving the oceans and the planet?

Emissions caused by sewage, animal farming, and other run-off increase the acidity of the ocean. Although it may not stop all pollutants, this would be a drastic improvement to the quality of ocean water. This would also help to regulate temperatures and habitats and diminish the reduction of turbulent waves and tempests that may be occurring in the ocean in an attempt to repair itself from human involvement.

What Perils Are Our Oceans Facing?

Our oceans are the largest bodies of water that we have on planet earth. As such, they may not be directly great for fresh drinking water - but they provide many things directly and indirectly that we may be unaware of. It is theorized that the enormity of the oceans was first created from constant volcanic eruptions in the past, where vast amounts of hydrogen and oxygen atoms bound together to form over 70% of the world's surface (oceans and other water sources). 

Our oceans are in great peril. Here are some of the main problems that the oceans contend with today:

Pollution

Pollution makes up one of the most obvious and dangerous issues that are facing our planet. This not only comes from the massive amounts of garbage that are found in landfills, but they are also a result of the direct contribution of rubbish dumped directly into water sources. This can come as a result of too much garbage, not enough space to fit all forms of trash, human disregard, and the lack of funds and land mass to contribute to the world's pollution issue. Some corporations and households also directly dump waste into the water system because of the lack of a proper sanitization system. This not only pollutes the water but can cause enormous amounts of acidity to add to the natural alkaline waters of the saltwater ocean.

Destruction of habitat

Oceans are one of the largest habitats for biodiversity on the planet. It not only houses marine life such as fish and other species but the enormous amounts of plants and mammals that rely on this ecosystem for food, shelter, and growth. Biodiversity in the ocean is on a rapid decline, mainly due to overfishing, pollution, and the rise in sea levels. Sea tourism such as large cruises and the formation of "party beaches" displaces aquatic life from their habits and disperses them further. This can often destroy habits and species altogether, as they are extremely sensitive to things such as pH levels, temperature, location, and lack of suitable mates or breeding grounds.

Climate change

Oceans do more than just provide biodiversity and a great avenue of travel, they directly affect temperature and climate change. It is well known that cities and towns near oceans have much more temperate climates; their summers are much cooler than others and their winters are also much warmer. This is due to the fact that water heats up slowly, and then releases that heat over long periods of time - serving to cool off slowly as well. Climate change and global warming directly correlate to this as more extreme temperatures can be attributed to the loss of the ozone layer, as well as the drastic change in our oceans.

How to Save The Ocean With Veganism

Increases biodiversity. If we were all to theoretically turn vegan tomorrow, the fishing industry would die right away. This would mean that fish and other living aquatic life would be free to multiply and reclaim their habitat as it settles. Although it may not solve the problem right away, nature would eventually normalize itself without human interference, allowing new formations of groups and species over the long term.

Regulates the pH levels. Emissions caused by sewage, animal farming, and other run-off increase the acidity of the ocean. Although it may not stop all pollutants, this would be a drastic improvement to the quality of ocean water. This would also help to regulate temperatures and habitats and diminish the reduction of turbulent waves and tempests that may be occurring in the ocean in an attempt to repair itself from human involvement.

It causes a shift in value systems. Every value system and lifestyle has to come with a psychological shift. There is no way that anyone can be dedicated to something if they do not have a primary "why" or reason for doing so. Although eating less meat may at first seem like a pointless way that would help the environment and our oceans, it causes a mental shift in ourselves, and more importantly, society to care about things other than greed, profits, and the exploitation of natural resources.

FAQs

What will happen if we don't save the ocean?

The continuance of destruction of our oceans will eventually destroy all biodiversity within, including habitats. This will also make temperatures more extreme and cause floods, tsunamis, and tempests. In the long term, the world as we know it may completely destroy itself.

Is veganism the only answer?

Veganism is only one of the many courses of action we can take to save the oceans. Being conscious of your recycling, making sustainable choices, and choosing to be more focused on environmental impacts are great ways to embark on a path of real change.

Is it too late to start?

It is never too late. The ocean wasn't polluted overnight and took many years to start to decline. While we wouldn't be able to save it in the same timeframe, our actions can echo into eternity.

 

 

 


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